LONANG COMMENTARIES

Legal Foundations

LONANG Curriculum

Constitutional Law

Call me a skeptic, but I can hardly believe what passes for law these days. Judicial legislation. Administrative regulations. Joint resolutions. Bald-faced attempts to redefine society at every level by any means possible.

I have doubts – habitual doubts – as to the validity of many of these. I find myself increasingly reluctant to embrace what others – government leaders, the legal profession, and the general public – apparently are willing to accept.

And then there are many open questions about the nature of law, government and society. But it’s not the answers generally floating around that bother me, so much as it is that nobody seems to be asking the right questions, or at least, the questions that I have. How can you get the right answers, if you don’t ask the right questions? So I intend to ask questions – a lot of questions – to figure out just what’s going on. Somebody’s got a lot of explaining to do.

So, let’s see if we can start at the beginning, or at least as close to the beginning as I can get without becoming mired in the philosophy of knowledge and such, and untangle some of this mess. I want to start with the basic questions that no one ever asked (much less answered) when I was in law school, like “What is law?” or “How do you know a law when you see one?” And, “What are the fundamental legal building blocks of society?” Nothing too heavy, just light stuff, really . . .